wkiepe replied to your post “I’ve been on hiatus for a while and still sorta am, but wow like…”

I saw you got into Stanford! Congratulations! That’s hella awesome!

thanks so much~!

chamomileyes replied to your post “I’ve been on hiatus for a while and still sorta am, but wow like…”

It’s not that bad a transition, at least in my experience.

I believe you! but regardless, it’s just so much to process :/

I’ve been on hiatus for a while and still sorta am, but wow like college is so close and I’m honestly terrified this is so real

feministballerina:

malonetaylor:

Did you know? It’s your RIGHT to access reproductive healthcare without being intimidated or terrorized.

People need to see this. 

feministballerina:

malonetaylor:

Did you know? It’s your RIGHT to access reproductive healthcare without being intimidated or terrorized.

People need to see this. 

this is why art teachers shouldn’t pretend to be English teachers

this is why art teachers shouldn’t pretend to be English teachers

A message from Anonymous


I rally loved your post on mujerista theology! thank you for all that information. I was wondering if you had any suggested woc theologians to look up? Or places I could find some? I'm think about studying religion when I get to college (I'm particularly interested in christianity in communities of color). Thank you so much!

kimkrypto:

wocinsolidarity:

I’d be happy to suggest some scholars!

Unfortunately this list is going to be very small, and limited to mainly Black, Latina, and East Asian scholars working within the U.S. This is because A) my concentration is Latinx Religious Social Ethics B) the GSFS Religion classes at my school usually only do a weeklong section on either Womanist Theology or Asian-American Feminist Theology (even the classes that are supposed to be “multicultural” or whatever mostly have readings that are white feminist critiques of PoC communities and religions).  

But of course followers are welcome to jump in and add their suggested readings and broaden all of our horizons! This is a VERY short list of the many WoC Religion scholars out there!

Also note: most of these scholars were influenced by WoC (like Gloria Anzaldúa and Alice Walker) who weren’t necessarily theologians, but their terms are central to a lot of ethical and theological praxis. 

Latina Feminist, Chicana Feminist, and Mujerista Theology

  • A Reader in Latina Feminist Theology: Religion and Justice, edited by María Pilar Aquino, Daisy Machado, and Jeanette Rodríguez
  • Our Cry for Life: Feminist Theology from Latin America by María Pilar Aquino 
  • Embracing Latina Spirituality: A Woman’s Perspective by Michelle Gonzalez Maldonado
  • Cultural Memory: Resistance, Faith, & Identity by Jeanette Rodriguez 
  • Mujerista Theology: A Theology for the Twenty-First Century by Ada Maria Isasi-Díaz

Asian-American Feminist and Asian Feminist Theology 

  • Off the Menu: Asian and Asian North American Women’s Religion and Theology edited by Rita Nakashima Brock, Jung Ha Kim, Pu-lan Kwok and Seung Ai Yang
  • Struggle to Be the Sun Again: Introducing Asian Women’s Theology by Chung Hyun Kyung 
  • Introducing Asian Feminist Theology by Kwok Pui-Lan
  • Proverbs of Ashes: Violence, Redemptive Suffering, and the Search for What Saves Us by Rita Nakashima Brock 

Womanist and Black Feminist Theology

  • Womanist Theological Ethics: A Reader edited by Katie G. Cannon, Emile Townes, and Angela Sims 
  • White Women’s Christ, Black Women’s Jesus: Feminist Christology and Womanist Response by Jacquelyn Grant
  • Sisters in the Wilderness: the Challenge of Womanist God-Talk by Dolores Williams
  • Making a Way Out of No Way: A Womanist Theology by Monica Coleman
  • Deeper Shades of Purple: Womanism in Religion and Society by Stacey Floyd-Thomas

Also if anyone wants to come talk to me about being a Religion major / religious ethics / Latinx social ethics / liberation theology / come say hi! 

- Jennifer 

oooh!!!

mainart:

Real windows framed as T.V screens (Project), 2014 Ibon Mainar

mainart:

Real windows framed as T.V screens (Project), 2014 Ibon Mainar

ethiopienne:

femme-in-floral:

How much time have you spent talking to some cishet dude when you didn’t want to just because you’re scared of what his reaction would be if you declined?

…and that’s what it means to be socialized into fear and constant male accommodation as a means of survival

cease-and-de-cis:

autisticwillgraham:

just a psa: when speaking about or to a disabled person, never use person first language unless they explicitly asked you too. the default is “disabled person.” not “person with a disability,” and especially not “handicapped” or “special needs.”

Or.. “differentlyabled” *cough*professor*cough*

nomadmanifesto:

i do not understand this liberal obsession with nonviolent resistance, but neither do i understand this leftist glorification of armed resistance. we do not bear arms in struggle because we’re too hot headed to give peace a chance as liberals think, but neither do we bear…

cease-and-de-cis:

fridgemagnetpoet:

majuscules:

monarchsundays:

majuscules:

emmaphorisms:

majuscules:

emmaphorisms:

the-real-goddamazon:

hardcorehousewife:

emmaphorisms:

Females grow pubic hair

Not all labias are symmetrical

Big clitorises are not unnatural

Vaginal secretions exist outside of sexual arousal

These secretions have a smell

Some more pungent than others

The female…

If this is your idea of social justice, I’m sorry but there are bigger fish to fry than getting angry at a post with valid anatomical information

Whoah sorry it’s just saying things about “female” anatomy isn’t actually correct! Some people with clitorises and labia aren’t female, and not all women have these anatomical structures. All these things are super important to know yes and they are absolutely not taught in sex education so your post is totally correct, I just think it’s a but exclusionary to use the word female because bodies don’t have gender.
Also what the fucking hell am I not allowed to get upset by cissexism

The cool thing is that female isn’t a gender, it is biological . Not all females identify as women, but that doesn’t make them not female. Not all males identify as men, but that doesn’t make them not male.

You are the one equating sex to gender. It is actually pretty harmful to tell kids that sex isn’t real, since sexual health is so important.

Female and male are necessary markers for specialized medical care. Telling a young trans man that they aren’t female doesn’t do them favors- it harms by making it stigmatized to see a doctor who specializes in female health. Telling a young trans woman that they are not male also harms them- they need not avoid health care specific to their sex. If you convince people they aren’t the sex they are, there will be a gross lack of health care.

The last thing I want are youths going through the difficulty of transition suffering from ovarian cancer, uterine cancer, endometriosis, or prostate cancer because the internet told them if they ignored biology everything would be better.

ah okay i see your point. thing is though, i still take issue with using the words “female” and “male” because sex actually IS a social construct!!! a better term to use would be “designated female at birth” or dfab because that actually does end up doing a better job of like, not invalidating the identities of trans/nb people. “female” is still equated with “woman” and is perceived as a gender. If health care is the issue, dfab is still a perfectly fine term to use because yes the healthcare system also is fucked up and tends to equate gender with sex, but like yo trans people aren’t born in a vaccuum like we know how the medical system perceives our bodies. but i would argue it’s better to validate someone’s identity, especially on a platform like this.

also your biological determinism is bullshit there’s no brightline between what youre calling “female” and “male” 

This is something I’ve been really frustrated with lately.  There are biological differences in terms of healthcare that depend on one’s genitals and dominant hormones.  It’s not that bodies need to be assigned sex/gender, but there definitely needs to be a respectful way to indicate to medical professionals what type of body they are treating.  Accurate diagnoses and the best care possible depend on it.  Dfab/dmab is great - but designated male/female at birth still uses the words male and female.  Is that significantly different than calling a body male or female?  As a cis person I could be misrepresenting or misunderstanding what has been said - please correct me or call me on my shit if I am being cissexist or invalidating anyone. 

Dfab and dmab are imperfect terms in many ways , but i would argue they’re different than /equating/ someone with the gender they were assigned at birth. They’re also an accurate descriptor that can help a medical professional understand what type of body they’re treating without invalidating the patients identity as whatever their actual gender is. They use the words female and male because that’s how our system identifies bodies at birth. Also like idk about alternatives that would be as effective (read: widely understood)

People can just refer to specific body parts/body systems. Don’t use dmab and dfab because these things tell you absolutely nothing other than assignment at birth, they do not indicate anything about bodies as they are now or body parts other than approximate genital presentation at birth. Do we really need to have the “sex is not binary” discussion again

Exactly. In your attempt to be “medically accurate” you’re prioritizing cis people over trans people, and dyadic people over intersex people.  Saying that a trans person at any stage in physical transition is male/female (depending on their assigned sex) is simply medically inaccurate, as much as you like to pretend it isn’t.  Continuing the trend of conflating assumed genitalia with male/female and assigned sex is harmful and even dangerous for trans people, and if you can’t understand that you need to take a step back.